Jobulo | Relocating for Work - Jobulo
4107
post-template-default,single,single-post,postid-4107,single-format-standard,ajax_fade,page_not_loaded,smooth_scroll,

Career Progression

Find advice articles on how to climb the career ladder in your chosen profession.

Relocating for Work

Relocating for WorkWhether you work for a small business or a corporate company – at some point in your career you may find yourself facing a possible relocation.

There are a variety of reasons why people face relocation at work. Your company moving offices, having more job promotion prospects on relocation and moving to a new company are all reasons why, one day, you might find yourself relocating.

But before you decide to pack your bags and leave there are a few things to consider before relocating. Whether you’ve been offered a job in a new country or a new city, here are some tips to help you decide if it’s the right career move for you:

Location

If your new office is in a great location then this is definitely a move worth considering. Whether you have been offered a new job at a different company or an internal job move at your current one, you need to consider the location you are potentially moving to. Does it offer all of the amenities you are used to? Does it offer good transport routes to travel to see your friends and relatives? These are definitely questions you should be asking yourself to ensure that the move is the right one for you. Throughout your career you may also be faced with a possible move abroad one day. If you are offered a position overseas you should do even more research on the role and the location including your visa restrictions, house prices and the local climate and local life. This will help you to form an all round opinion of the local area and should help you decide whether the location is right for you. Kaitlyn Critchley previously relocated from Canada to Australia and says it’s hard work moving countries but it can be worth it: “I was at university abroad too but being at uni makes it really easy to make friends – you’re surrounded by hundreds of people your age who share similar interests. When you’re working and you don’t have that in-built support network, it can be a bit more challenging to meet people, so you really have to be willing to put yourself out there. Working abroad also comes with more responsibility but more rewards too! Right now, because I’m earning money in Australian dollars and the exchange rate is so favourable, I’m saving more than I probably would have at home in Canada or in the UK. And of course, there are plenty of opportunities to travel and enjoy the gorgeous beaches and scenery!”

Career Prospects

A lot of job role moves come with better career prospects and more opportunity. But if you’re not sure whether this would be the case for you on relocation then you should check your relocation package and consider whether it’s the right career move for you. Find out your promotion path – can you secure a job promotion in the next few years? Are there more opportunities at this new office than in your current one? Are there opportunities to work in a variety of roles? If you answered yes to any of these then it could be a good move to relocate. Rebekah Scanlan is a Journalist from the UK. She relocated to Australia and explains how relocating can sometimes be the right decision for your career path: “I went to Australia to experience what it was like working abroad for just six months. But within a few months I decided that I wasn’t ready to leave. Working here is very different to working for magazines in the UK. Mostly though it was the opportunities available here in Australia that made me want to stay. I was desperate to progress my career, but with the tough economical climate back home in the UK it just wasn’t going to happen anywhere near as quickly as I wanted it to. The magazine industry is a fierce place and there was so much competition. So when I saw a fantastic opportunity I took it. I haven’t looked back since.”

But although a move can be good for your career Rebekah also warns that it can be tough and takes some serious consideration: “Aside from the obvious issues (starting from scratch, learning your trade in a different style) the hardest thing about living on the other side of the world is being away from friends and family. It doesn’t get easier.”

Salary

Your salary is an important part of your every day working life. Not only is it essential for your everyday living costs, but your salary can also determine how well you can save for the future and what opportunities you might be able to grab too. If you are given the opportunity to relocate to a different country you should also consider the exchange rate and the cost of living to really assess whether it’s a financially viable move.